2014 Cornell Guide for Integrated Field Crop Management

Due to budgetary constraints, the 2014 Cornell Guide for Integrated Field Crop Management will not be available online. We are currently exploring options that will allow us to recover the costs of posting this publication online. We hope to have the Guidelines back online in 2015.

The table of contents for this publication is provided below as a reference. A print copy can be purchased through your local Cornell Cooperative Extension office or the Cornell Store at Cornell University (800-624-4080 or online).

Questions or comments? Send an email to PMEP_Webmaster@cornell.edu.

Table of Contents

  • 1 PESTICIDE INFORMATION
    • 1.1 Pesticide Classification and Certification
    • 1.2 Use Pesticides Safely
      • 1.2.1 Plan Ahead
      • 1.2.2 Move Pesticides Safely
      • 1.2.3 Personal Protective Equipment
      • 1.2.4 Avoid Drift, Runoff, and Spills
      • 1.2.5 Avoid Equipment Accidents
      • 1.2.6 Pesticide Storage
    • 1.3 Pollenator Protection
    • 1.4 New York State Pesticide Control Legislation
      • 1.4.1 Restricted-Use Pesticides
      • 1.4.2 Additional Use Restrictions
    • 1.5 Verifying Pesticide Registration and Restricted-Use Status
    • 1.6 Check the Label for Site and Pest
    • 1.7 Pesticide Recordkeeping/Reporting
      • 1.7.1 New York State Requirements
      • 1.7.2 Federal Private Applicator Recordkeeping Requirements
    • 1.8 EPA Worker Protection Standard (WPS) for Agricultural Pesticides
    • 1.9 Reduced-Risk Pesticides, Minimum-Risk Pesticides, and Biopesticides
      • 1.9.1 Reduced-Risk Pesticides
      • 1.9.2 Minimum-Risk Pesticides
      • 1.9.3 Biopesticides
    • 1.10 FIFRA 2(ee) Recommendations
  • 2 GENERAL INFORMATION FOR CROP PRODUCTION
    • 2.1 Introduction
    • 2.2 New York State Climate
      • 2.2.1 Growing Degree Days for Corn and Soybeans
    • 2.3 Soil Surveys
    • 2.4 Soils and Soil Management Groups of New York
      • 2.4.1 Soil Management Group I
      • 2.4.2 Soil Management Group II
      • 2.4.3 Soil Management Group III
      • 2.4.4 Soil Management Group IV
      • 2.4.5 Soil Management Group V
      • 2.4.6 Other Areas
    • 2.5 Soil Health
      • 2.5.1 The Cornell Soil Health Test
    • 2.6 Runoff and Soil Erosion
      • 2.6.1 Tillage Erosion
      • 2.6.2 Solving Erosion Problems
      • 2.6.3 Wind Erosion
    • 2.7 Soil Compaction
      • 2.7.1 Effects of Soil Compaction on Crops
      • 2.7.2 Diagnosing Plow Layer and Subsoil Compaction
      • 2.7.3 Addressing Soil Compaction Problems
    • 2.8 Tillage
      • 2.8.1 Full-Width Primary Tillage Systems
      • 2.8.2 Secondary Tillage
      • 2.8.3 Restricted-Tillage Systems
      • 2.8.4 Deep Tillage
      • 2.8.5 Frost Tillage
      • 2.8.6 Selecting a Tillage System
    • 2.9 Nutrients and the Environment
      • 2.9.1 Nitrate Leaching Index
      • 2.9.2 NY Phosphorus Index
      • 2.9.3 Manure Spreading Guidelines During Adverse Weather Conditions
    • 2.10 Soil Testing
      • 2.10.1 Why Test Soil?
      • 2.10.2 What is a Soil Testing Program?
      • 2.10.3 How Does a Soil Test Work?
      • 2.10.4 How to Collect and Submit a Soil Sample
      • 2.10.5 How Often Should Samples be Taken?
      • 2.10.6 Variable Rate Management
      • 2.10.7 Interpretation of Soil Test Results
      • 2.10.8 Return of Guidelines
    • 2.11 Fertilizers
      • 2.11.1 Using the Fertilizer Tables
      • 2.11.2 Fertilizer Materials
      • 2.11.3 Fertilizer Injury
      • 2.11.4 Secondary Nutrients and Micronutrients
    • 2.12 Lime Guidelines
      • 2.12.1 Lime Rate Table
      • 2.12.2 Lime Applications
      • 2.12.3 Liming for No-Tillage Production
      • 2.12.4 Points to Remember When Using Lime Guidelines Without Buffer pH Data
      • 2.12.5 Calcium and Magnesium Content of Limestones
    • 2.13 Land Application of Sewage Sludges
      • 2.13.1 Application Rates
      • 2.13.2 Nutrients
      • 2.13.3 Metals
      • 2.13.4 Synthetic Organic Chemicals
      • 2.13.5 Pathogens
      • 2.13.6 Sludge Guidelines
    • 2.14 Integrated Pest Management for Field Crops
      • 2.14.1 Identification
      • 2.14.2 Sampling
      • 2.14.3 Analysis
      • 2.14.4 Management Alternatives
      • 2.14.5 Implementation
      • 2.14.6 Evaluation
    • 2.15 Integrated Management of Field Crop Diseases
  • 3 CORN GUIDELINES
    • 3.1 Planting Techniques
    • 3.2 Hybrid Selection
      • 3.2.1 Corn Silage Hybrids
      • 3.2.2 Corn Grain Hybrids
    • 3.3 Fertilizers for Corn
      • 3.3.1 Band Rates
      • 3.3.2 Efficient Nitrogen Use
      • 3.3.3 Nitrogen Status of the Corn Crop
      • 3.3.4 Adapt-N – Incorporating Weather Information to Adjust Corn N Rates in Season
    • 3.4 Managing Field Corn Pest Problems in New York
    • 3.5 Managing Diseases of Corn
      • 3.5.1 Seed Treatment Fungicides
      • 3.5.2 Selection of Disease-Resistant Varieties
      • 3.5.3 Sound Crop Management
      • 3.5.4 Foliar Fungicide Application
    • 3.6 Managing Insects, Slugs, and Nematodes in Corn
      • 3.6.1 European Corn Borer
      • 3.6.2 Northern and Western Corn Rootworms
      • 3.6.3 Seed Corn Maggot
      • 3.6.4 Cutworms
      • 3.6.5 Armyworms
      • 3.6.6 Wireworms and White Grubs
      • 3.6.7 Potato Stem Borer and Hopvine Borer
      • 3.6.8 Western Bean Cutworm
      • 3.6.9 Slugs
      • 3.6.10 Nematodes
    • 3.7 Managing Weeds in Corn
      • 3.7.1 Weed Management Methods
      • 3.7.2 Factors Affecting Soil-Applied Herbicides
      • 3.7.3 Herbicide Resistance Management
      • 3.7.4 Weed Control in Zone/No-Tillage Corn
      • 3.7.5 Prepackaged Herbicide Mixtures
      • 3.7.6 *Atrazine Application Rates
  • 4 FORAGE CROPS GUIDELINES
    • 4.1 Forage Varieties
      • 4.1.1 Alfalfa
      • 4.1.2 Birdsfoot Trefoil
      • 4.1.3 Red Clover
      • 4.1.4 Alsike Clover
      • 4.1.5 Crownvetch
    • 4.2 Perennial Grasses
      • 4.2.1 Reed Canarygrass
      • 4.2.2 Timothy
      • 4.2.3 Smooth Bromegrass
      • 4.2.4 Orchardgrass
      • 4.2.5 Ryegrasses
      • 4.2.6 Tall Fescue
      • 4.2.7 Festulolium
      • 4.2.8 Perennial Forage Variety Selection
    • 4.3 Annual Crops for Forage
      • 4.3.1 Sudangrass and Forage Sorghums
      • 4.3.2 BMR Sorghum-Sudangrass Hybrids
      • 4.3.3 Anti-Quality Components
      • 4.3.4 Millets
      • 4.3.5 Oats and Spring Triticales
      • 4.3.6 Winter Wheat, Barley, Rye, and Triticales
    • 4.4 Planting Perennial Legumes and Grasses
      • 4.4.1 Seedbed Preparation
      • 4.4.2 Date of Seeding
      • 4.4.3 Inoculation
      • 4.4.4 Fertilizers and Lime for Legume Establishment
      • 4.4.5 Companion Crops
      • 4.4.6 Species Selection
    • 4.5 Harvest Schedules
      • 4.5.1 Alfalfa
      • 4.5.2 Perennial Grasses
    • 4.6 Forage Fertilization
      • 4.6.1 Considerations for Manure Use for Alfafa-Grass production
    • 4.7 Forages for Conservation
    • 4.8. Managing Alfalfa Pest Problems in New York
    • 4.9 Managing Diseases of Perennial Forage Legumes
      • 4.9.1 Vascular Wilts
      • 4.9.2 Root, Crown, and Stem Rots
      • 4.9.3 Leaf and Stem Blights
      • 4.9.4 Seed Fungicides
      • 4.9.5 Selection of Disease-Resistant Varieties
      • 4.9.6 Sound Stand Management
    • 4.10 Managing Insects in Forage Crops
      • 4.10.1 Alfalfa Weevil
      • 4.10.2 Potato Leafhopper
      • 4.10.3 Alfalfa Snout Beetle
    • 4.11 Weed Control in Forages
      • 4.11.1 Herbicide Resistance Management
    • 4.12 Minimum-Tillage Forage Seedings
      • 4.12.1 Vegetation Control
      • 4.12.2 Seeding Methods
      • 4.12.3 Insect Control
    • 4.13 Perennial Forages for Pasture
      • 4.13.1 Ladino White Clover (Trifolium repens L.)
      • 4.13.2 Kentucky Bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.)
      • 4.13.3 Tall Fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb)
      • 4.13.4 Use of Pastures
      • 4.13.5 Grass-Legume Mixtures
    • 4.14 Weed Control in Grass Pastures
      • 4.14.1 Herbicide Resistance Management
  • 5 SMALL GRAIN CROPS GUIDELINES
    • 5.1 Planting Techniques
      • 5.1.1 Winter Grains
      • 5.1.2 Spring Grains
    • 5.2 Variety Selection
      • 5.2.1 Winter Wheat
      • 5.2.2 Spring Wheat
      • 5.2.3 Spring Oat
      • 5.2.4 Winter Barley
      • 5.2.5 Spring Barley
      • 5.2.6 Malting Barley
      • 5.2.7 Winter Rye
      • 5.2.8 Triticale
      • 5.2.9 Spelt
      • 5.2.10 Buckwheat
      • 5.2.11 Other Grain-Type Crops
    • 5.3 Why We Recommend Certified Seed
    • 5.4 Growth Stages in Small Grains
      • 5.4.1 Winter Wheat
      • 5.4.2 Spring Grains
    • 5.5 Fertilizers for Small Grains
      • 5.5.1 Lodging Control in Wheat or Barley
    • 5.6 Managing Winter Wheat Pest Problems in New York
    • 5.7 Managing Diseases of Small Grain Cereals
      • 5.7.1 Selection of Disease-Resistant or Disease-Tolerant Varieties
      • 5.7.2 Seed Treatment
      • 5.7.3 Foliar Fungicides
      • 5.7.4 Guidelines for Wheat Fungicide Decisions
      • 5.7.5 Sound Agronomic Practices
    • 5.8 Managing Insects in Small Grains
      • 5.8.1 Armyworms
      • 5.8.2 Cereal Leaf Beetle
      • 5.8.3 Hessian Fly
    • 5.9 Weed Control in Small Grains
      • 5.9.1 Herbicide Resistance Management
  • 6 SOYBEAN GUIDELINES
    • 6.1 Soybean Varieties
    • 6.2 Soybean Planting
    • 6.3 Managing the Crop
    • 6.4 Managing Soybean Pest Problems in New York
    • 6.5 Managing Diseases of Soybeans
      • 6.5.1 Fungicidal Seed Treatment
      • 6.5.2 Foliar Fungicides
      • 6.5.3 Management of Asian Soybean Rust
    • 6.6 Managing Insects in Soybeans
      • 6.6.1 Seed Corn Maggot
      • 6.6.2 Soybean Aphid
      • 6.6.3 Two-spotted Spider Mites
    • 6.7 Weed Control in Soybeans
      • 6.7.1 Herbicide Resistance Management
  • 7 TOTAL VEGETATION CONTROL AND CONVERSION TABLES
    • 7.1 Total Vegetation Control
    • 7.2 Conversion Tables
  • 8 APPENDIX
    • 8.1 Trade and Common Names of Field Crop Pesticides
    • 8.2 Herbicide Site of Action Groups and Mode/Site of Action Information.
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