2014 New York and Pennsylvania Pest Management Guidelines for Grapes

Due to budgetary constraints, the 2014 New York and Pennsylvania Pest Management Guidelines for Grapes will not be available online. We are currently exploring options that will allow us to recover the costs of posting this publication online. We hope to have the Guidelines back online in 2015.

The table of contents for this publication is provided below as a reference. A print copy may be purchased through your local Cornell Cooperative Extension or Penn State Cooperative Extension office. Copies can also be purchased through the Cornell Store at Cornell University (800-624-4080 or online).

Questions or comments? Send an email to PMEP_Webmaster@cornell.edu.

Table of Contents

  • 1 PESTICIDE INFORMATION
    • 1.1 Pesticide Classification and Certification
    • 1.2 Use Pesticides Safely
      • 1.2.1 Plan Ahead
      • 1.2.2 Move Pesticides Safely
      • 1.2.3 Personal Protective Equipment
      • 1.2.4 Avoid Drift, Runoff, and Spills
      • 1.2.5 Avoid Equipment Accidents
      • 1.2.6 Pesticide Storage
    • 1.3 Pollenator Protection
    • 1.4 New York State Pesticide Control Legislation
    • 1.5 Verifying Pesticide Registration and Restricted-Use Status
    • 1.6 Check the Label for Site and Pest
    • 1.7 Pesticide Recordkeeping/Reporting
    • 1.8 EPA Worker Protection Standard (WPS) for Agricultural Pesticides
    • 1.9 Reduced-Risk Pesticides, Minimum-Risk Pesticides, and Biopesticides
    • 1.10 FIFRA 2(ee) Recommendations
  • 2 INTRODUCTION
    • 2.1 Overview
    • 2.2 Specific Fungicide, Insecticide, and Herbicide Information
    • 2.3 How to Develop a Vineyard Pest Management Strategy
    • 2.4 Growth Stages Critical to Grape Pest Management
    • 2.5 Cornell Publications on Weeds, Insects and Diseases of Grapevines
  • 3 VINEYARD DISEASE MANAGEMENT
    • 3.1 Pest Information – Diseases
      • Table 3.1.1. Hours of leaf wetness required for a black rot infection period
      • Table 3.1.2. Relative disease susceptibility and sensitivity to sulfur and copper among grape varieties
      • Table 3.1.3. Approximate generation period for powdery mildew
    • 3.2 Fungicide Information
    • Table 3.2.1. Physical modes of action of and resistance risk of fungicides used in management of grape diseases.
    • Table 3.2.2. Effectiveness of fungicides for management of grape diseases
  • 4 VINEYARD INSECT & MITE MANAGEMENT
    • 4.1 Pest Information – Insects
    • 4.2 Insecticide Information
    • Table 4.2.1. Effectiveness of insecticides for management of grape insects and mites.
    • Table 4.2.2. Insecticides for use in New York and Pennsylvania vineyards
  • 5 PEST MANAGEMENT SCHEDULES FOR DISEASES AND MAJOR AND MINOR INSECTS
    • 5.1 Introduction
    • 5.2 Pest Management Schedules for Diseases and Major Insects
      • 5.2.1. Dormant
      • 5.2.2. Delayed Dormant
      • 5.2.3. Bud Swell
      • 5.2.4. 1-inch shoot growth (when the average shoot length is 1 inch)
      • 5.2.5. 3- to 5-inch shoot growth (new shoots are 3-5 inches long)
      • 5.2.6 10- to 12-inch shoot growth (new shoots are 10-12 inches long)
      • 5.2.7. Immediate prebloom (just before blossoms open)
      • 5.2.8. Bloom (when 80-90% of the caps have fallen)
      • 5.2.9. First postbloom spray (10-14 days after immediate prebloom)
      • 5.2.10. Second postbloom spray (7-14 days after first postbloom spray)
      • 5.2.11. Midsummer sprays (July and August, as necessary)
      • 5.2.12. Postharvest
    • 5.3 Pest Management Schedules for Minor and Special Insects
      • 5.3.1. Dormant to bud swell
      • 5.3.2. Bud swell to 5-inch shoot growth (new shoots are 0-5 inches long)
      • 5.3.3. 10- to 12-inch shoot growth (new shoots are 10-12 inches long)
      • 5.3.4. Summer to preharvest
      • 5.3.5. Preharvest
  • 6 VINEYARD WEED MANAGEMENT
    • 6.1 Introduction
    • 6.2 Resources
    • 6.3 Effective Use of Herbicides
    • 6.4 Preemergence Herbicides
    • 6.5 Postemergence Herbicides
    • 6.6 Herbicides for Nonbearing Vineyards
    • 6.7 Specialty Use Herbicides
  • 7 SPRAYER TECHNOLOGY
    • 7.1 Preparing the Airblast Sprayer for Work
    • 7.2 Equipment for Weed Control in Vineyards
    • 7.3 Selecting the Correct Nozzle to Reduce Drift
    • 7.4 Sprayer Calibration
      • 7.4.1 Travel Speed Calibration
      • 7.4.2 Airblast Sprayer Calibration
      • 7.4.3 Calibrating a Kinkelder Sprayer
      • 7.4.4 Calibrating an AgTec Sprayer
      • 7.4.5 Boom Sprayer Calibration
    • 7.5 Selecting Nozzles from the Nozzle Catalogue – Airblast Sprayers
    • 7.6 Selecting Nozzles from the Nozzle Catalogue –Boom Sprayers
    • 7.7 Reducing Drift from Airblast Sprayers in Vineyards
    • 7.8 Management Strategies to Reduce Drift
    • 7.9 Solutions for Safer Spraying
      • 7.9.1 Why use Engineering Controls?
      • 7.9.2 Loading the Sprayer
      • 7.9.3 Reducing Contamination at the Boom
      • 7.9.4 Drift and Contaminated Clothing in Cabs
      • 7.9.5 Controlling Drift
      • 7.9.6 Cleaning the Sprayer
    • 7.10 Spraying Small Vineyards
      • 7.10.1 Prior to Spraying – Calibrating Sprayers
      • 7.10.2 Calculating the Amount of Pesticide to Use
      • 7.10.3 Measuring Small Amounts of Pesticide
      • 7.10.4 Selecting a Small Sprayer for the Small Vineyard
    • 7.11 Going Spraying! Mixing Procedures
    • 7.12 Decontaminating and Storing Crop Sprayers
      • 7.12.1 Sprayer Decontamination and Maintenance
      • 7.12.2 Cleaning when Similar Products are to be Used
      • 7.12.3 Cleaning when Product Type is Changed
      • 7.12.4 Disposal of Pesticide Waste
      • 7.12.5 Storage of Sprayers
    • 7.13 Distance Learning
  • 8 PESTICIDES FOR NEW YORK AND PENNSYLVANIA VINEYARDS
    • 8.1 Herbicides
    • 8.2 Insecticides and acaricides
    • 8.3 Fungicides
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